About Us High School Course Descriptions
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High School Course Descriptions

CHRISTIAN ETHICS

** Students must successfully complete their Christian Ethics credit for each year that they are enrolled at Regina Christian School. Participation in the graduation exercises and ceremonies is contingent on the successful completion of each Christian Ethics course.

Christian Ethics 9

This course explores the nature and character of God through studying His word. Students will be faced with such questions as:

  • Why do we need to study the attributes of God?
  • How do these facts about God affect me today?
  • Why is this study important for our lives?

Christian Ethics 10

  • examines the truth of God’s word as recorded in the Law and Old Testament historical books
  • explores the foundations of the Christian worldview provided in Genesis
  • discusses the veracity of the Bible and it’s authority in the life of a Christian
  • provides opportunity to grow deeper in relationship with Christ and Christian community

Christian Ethics 20

  • examines the truth of God’s word as recorded in the Old Testament books of poetry and prophecy
  • explores the wisdom offered to followers of God in Proverbs
  • discusses the nature and power of God, the nature of humans and the reality and effects of sin
  • examines the beliefs of various world religions, spiritualties, and Christian denominations
  • provides opportunity to grow deeper in relationship with Christ and Christian community

Christian Ethics 30

  • examines the truth of God’s word as recorded in the New Testament letters and books of history and prophecy
  • explores the truth, implications, and applications of the gospel as given in Romans
  • discusses the community of the church, sacraments, the work of the Holy Spirit, and eschatology
  • provides opportunity to grow deeper in relationship with Christ and Christian community
  • clarifies each student’s worldview, values, and commitments in transition to their adult lives


ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

ELA A9 and ELA B9

ELA 9A and 9B are comprehensive English Language Arts courses in which students will learn to:

  1. a) comprehend and respond to a variety of grade-level print, oral, and multimedia texts;
  2. b) compose and create in a variety of forms for different purposes and audiences; and
  3. c) assess and reflect on their own language skills

These courses include the Communication Skills book to work on foundational grammar. The two thematic units of study for each course are:

  • ELA 9A: Doing the Right Thing – Conflicts, Challenges, Issues, and Choices and All That I Am — The Search for Self
  • ELA 9B: Loyalty, Love, and Relationships and Surviving and Conquering

ELA 10A and 10B

ELA 10A and 10B are comprehensive English Language Arts courses in which students will learn to:

  1. a) comprehend and respond to a variety of grade-level print, oral, and multimedia texts
  2. b) compose and create in a variety of forms for different purposes and audiences
  3. c) assess and reflect on their own language skills

The two thematic units of study for each course are:

  • ELA 10A: The Challenges of Life and The Mysteries of Life
  • ELA 10B: Equity and Ethics and The World Around and Within Us

ELA 20

ELA 20 is a comprehensive English Language Arts course in which students will learn to:

  1. a) comprehend and respond to a variety of grade-level print, oral, and multimedia texts
  2. b) compose and create in a variety of forms for different purposes and audiences
  3. c) assess and reflect on their own language skills

The two thematic units of study for ELA 20 are:

  • Starting Out—Beginning and Becoming
  • Moving Forward—Establishing and Realizing

Creative Writing 20

Creative Writing 20 is a project-based course that focuses on developing the writing process and helping young writers gain confidence and to develop their writing voice across different genres and styles; including poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction. Students will learn how to compose, revise, edit, and workshop their writing. They will also complete an independent project and/or portfolio.

English Language Arts A30 Canadian Voices and Perspective

This course includes two units of study:

  • Diverse Landscape and People
    • A Vast and Varied Land
    • Nature and Seasons
    • Regional Landscapes
    • Identity and Diversity
    • Personality and Values
  • Diverse Canadian Voices
    • Aboriginal Voices
    • Voices Through Time
    • Regional Voices
    • Female and Male Voices
  • Students will compose, create, comprehend and respond (through listening, reading, and viewing activities)to a variety of contemporary and traditional grade-level texts in a variety of forms (oral, print, and other texts) from First Nations/Métis and other cultures for a variety of purposes.
  • Students will assess and reflect their own language skills and set goals for future improvement.

English Language Arts B30 World Voices and Perspectives

This course takes a thematic approach while focusing on literature that explores the history of the English language. Units of study include:

  • The Human Condition – In Search of Self
    • Identity and Sense of Self
    • Human Qualities and Ideals
    • Human Relationships
    • Joy and Inspiration
  • Challenges—The Social Experience – Beyond Personal Goals
    • Individual and Social Responsibility
    • Truth and Justice
    • Ambition, Power and Common Good
    • Social Criticism
  • Issues to be studied through literature include Responsibility, Truth and Justice, Ambition and the Common Good, Identity, Relationships, and Human Qualities and Ideals
  • Students will compose, create, comprehend and respond (through listening, reading, and viewing activities)to a variety of contemporary and traditional grade-level texts in a variety of forms (oral, print, and other texts) from First Nations/Métis and other cultures for a variety of purposes.
  • Students will assess and reflect their own language skills and set goals for future improvement.


ARTS EDUCATION

Arts Education 9

  • divided between two-dimensional art and clay sculpture

Choral 9 / 10 / 20 / 30

Additional course fees will apply

  • various singing engagements and performances
  • evaluation based on attendance, active participation, knowledge of the vocal part and attitude during rehearsals and performances
  • 3-4 day choir tour will take place near the end of the semester

Visual Art 10

Additional course fees will apply

  • divided between two and three-dimensional art
  • strongly recommended for the 20 level art courses

Visual Art 20

Additional course fees will apply

  • Visual Art 10 is recommended as a prerequisite, but not required
  • continues with two-dimensional art, further developing drawing skills
  • introduces oil and acrylic painting in the last half of the semester

Visual Art 30

Additional course fees will apply

  • Visual Art 20 is recommended as a prerequisite, but not required
  • skills introduced in preceding art courses are to be followed and furthered in an independent course of study

Drama 10

  • encourages students to explore life by assuming roles and acquiring dramatic skills
  • emphasizes the individual as a performer, critic and patron
  • develops an appreciation of theatre as a traditional art form
  • involves movement, mime, speech improvisation, acting and scene study
  • collective creation and theatre studies are emphasized

Drama 20

  • Drama 10 is recommended as a prerequisite, but is not required
  • builds on the values and skills introduced in Drama 10
  • includes problem solving, voice dynamics, minimal scripts or scene study, dramatic anthologies, and stagecraft
  • optional units are clowning and children’s theatre

Drama 30

  • Drama 20 is recommended as a prerequisite, but is not required
  • builds on the values introduced in Drama 20
  • continues to build on voice dynamics, acting techniques and scene studies
  • more thorough scene developments, stage craft techniques and play reviews
  • optional units on theatre history

FRENCH

French 9

  • This is an introductory course to the high school program
  • Basic French vocabulary is introduced and practiced in oral and written form
  • Students are given ample opportunity to review grammatical structures in a variety of settings
  • No previous French is required

French 10

French 9 is a prerequisite to this course

  • This is a continuation of French 9
  • Further basic French vocabulary is introduced and practiced in oral and written form
  • Students start to work with conversation partners to practice limited conversations in French
  • This course begins to explore French verbs

French 20

French 10 is a prerequisite to this course

  • This is a continuation of French 10
  • Previous vocabulary and verbs are reviewed and practiced as needed by the class
  • Any previous grammatical structures are also reviewed and practiced as needed by the class
  • New conversations are introduced and practiced in the classroom setting

French 30

French 20 is a prerequisite to this course

  • This is a continuation of French 20
  • Students continue to add basic vocabulary and grammatical structures to their French language abilities
  • Previous vocabulary and grammatical structures are reviewed as needed
  • Students continue to work on their conversational ability with a conversation partner


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Wellness 10

  • develop positive attitudes towards physical activity and fitness
  • develop positive social behavior and positive relationships with others
  • integrated health and physical education curriculum
  • topics include physical activity and fitness, service learning, mental health, self- awareness/self-management, culture of safety, relationships, spirituality, community challenges and healthy eating
  • activities planned give students opportunity to acquire, practice, and refine the skills taught
  • encourages wellness as a lifelong way of being
  • highly recommended for the compulsory Physical Education credit

Physical Education 20

Additional course fees will apply

  • utilizes recreational activities available in the community
  • activities are experienced using a number of facilities
  • activities include water polo, five and ten pin bowling, curling, racquetball, skiing, swimming, tennis, golf, pool, lawn bowling and a variety of gymnasium sports
  • challenges students in leadership and creative thinking

Physical Education 30

Additional course fees will apply

  • extension of Physical Education 20


MATHEMATICS

Math 9

  • builds on math concepts from previous year
  • provides a foundation for problem solving using rational numbers, geometry and measurement, data analysis, and basic algebra

About the Pathways for Math 10 and 20

Workplace and Apprenticeship

  • Content in this pathway was chosen to meet the needs of students intending to pursue careers in the trades and general workplaces.
  • Students who enjoy hands-on work would be well-suited for this pathway.
  • 30% to 40% of all Grade 12 graduates are entering fields for which the mathematics in this pathway is appropriate

Pre-Calculus

  • Content in this pathway was chosen to meet the needs of students interested in pursuing careers in science-related areas.
  • 10% to 20% of all Grade 12 graduates are entering fields for which the mathematics in this pathway is appropriate

Foundations of Mathematics

  • Content in this pathway was chosen to meet the needs of students intending to pursue careers in areas that typically require university, but are not math intensive, such as the humanities, fine arts, social sciences, and nursing.
  • 40% to 60% of all Grade 12 graduates are entering fields for which the mathematics in this pathway is appropriate

Can a student change pathways?

Yes, but they need to have the prerequisite pathway courses. Because the content of courses in each pathway is unique, a course from one pathway will not provide the background knowledge necessary to be successful in another pathway.

Workplace and Apprenticeship 10

  • This course focuses on mathematics that will be used in the workplace, especially for those who are planning to apprentice for a trade, take a college course or enter the workplace directly after graduation form secondary school.
  • Several of the chapters include a focus on consumer and business mathematics. Others concentrate on mathematics that provide essential knowledge for specific trades and occupations.
  • We recommend that all students take this course in Grade 10.
  • This course is the prerequisite for Workplace and Apprenticeship 20.

Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10

  • This course covers many of the traditional topics in math such as factoring, exponents, graphing lines and trigonometry, as well as the added topic of Imperial and metric measurement conversions.
  • This course is the prerequisite for Foundations 20 and Pre-Calculus 20.
  • We recommend that all students take this course in Grade 10.
  • Foundations and Pre-Calculus pathways are designed for those students planning on going on to Post Secondary Institutions.

Workplace and Apprenticeship Mathematics 20

● Workplace and Apprenticeship Math 10 is a prerequisite

  • This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills identified for entry into some technical institute programs (SIAST), select university programs, and for direct entry into the workforce.
  • Topics include algebra, geometry, measurement, numeracy, statistics, and probability

Foundations of Mathematics 20

● Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10 is a prerequisite

  • This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical skills identified for post secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of theoretical Calculus.
  • Topics include financial mathematics, geometry, measurement, numeracy, logical reasoning, relations and functions, statistics and probability.

Pre-Calculus 20

● Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10 is a prerequisite

  • This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical skills identified for entry into post secondary studies in programs that require the study of theoretical Calculus.
  • Topics include algebra and number theory, measurement, relations and functions, and trigonometry

Workplace and Apprenticeship Mathematics 30

● Workplace and Apprenticeship Math 20 is a prerequisite

  • This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills identified for entry into some technical institute programs (SIAST), select university programs, and for direct entry into the workforce.
  • Topics include linear relations, measurement, statistics, probability, geometry, trigonometry, transformations, consumer mathematics.

 Foundations of Mathematics 30

● Foundations 20 is a prerequisite

  • This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical skills identified for post secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of theoretical Calculus.
  • Topics include set theory and logic, probability, functions and financial applications.

Pre-Calculus 30

● Pre-Calculus 20 is a prerequisite

  • This pathway is designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical skills identified for entry into post secondary studies in programs that require the study of theoretical Calculus.
  • Topics include transformations and functions, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, function operations, permutations, combinations, and binomial theorem

Calculus 30

●   Pre-Calculus 30 is a prerequisite

  • covers the study of limits, differentiation, integration, maxima and minima, area, and related rates


PRACTICAL AND APPLIED ARTS

Practical and Applied Arts 9

Additional course fees will apply

  • units may include woodworking, sewing, cooking and career guidance

Career & Work Exploration 10

  • provides opportunity for students to create a resume and portfolio and to participate in mock interviews
  • presents the principles of the career development continuum: career awareness, career exploration, and career experience
  • focuses on self-awareness and success in career development
  • develops a responsible attitude toward work experience in a work environment
  • includes 40 hours in an off-campus work placement

Career & Work Exploration 20

  • introduces some of the key concepts of career development as well as several essential career building and career planning tools
  • studies the relationship among work, society, and economy
  • explores labour standards and workplace safety, including WHMIS
  • teaches job search strategies
  • includes 50 hours in an off-campus work placement

Career & Work Exploration A 30 and B 30

  • builds on the career planning tools from previous courses
  • provides a more in-depth study of all principles in the career development continuum
  • investigates workplace ethics, human rights, and equality
  • includes 70 hours in an off-campus work placement

Construction + Carpentry 10 Woodworking

Additional course fees will apply

  • familiarizes students with a variety of hand and power tools
  • provides opportunity to build and finish individual projects
  • introduces various procedures in residential building and renovating
  • students are responsible for the cost of the materials used for projects

Construction + Carpentry 20

Additional course fees will apply

●   Construction + Carpentry 10 is a prerequisite

  • power tools are used in more advanced techniques and projects
  • construction techniques are applied to actual job applications
  • construction techniques are applied to actual job applications

Construction + Carpentry 30

Additional course fees will apply

●   Construction + Carpentry 20 is a prerequisite

  • expands on Construction + Carpentry 20 by refining finishing carpentry skills
  • opportunity for further advanced projects on job sites

Entrepreneurship 30

The aim of the Entrepreneurship 30 curriculum is to provide students with opportunities to:

  • acquire knowledge and develop skills necessary to plan and begin a venture
  • appreciate the role that entrepreneurs play in our society and economy
  • develop an appreciation for the impact entrepreneurs have and for the complexity involved in planning, initiating and operating a successful business
  • develop communication and technological skills needed to relate to customers, employers, employees and other parties
  • working with the Junior Achievement program, students will develop, operate and close a business, engaging with the business community in Regina

Food Studies 10 – offered in alternate years

Additional course fees will apply

  • provides students with instruction and experience related to kitchen basics, food safety, food and health, and other modules
  • offers students opportunity to prepare foods, including main dishes, desserts, ethnic cuisine, and others
  • prepares students to undergo all tasks related to managing a home kitchen, including budgeting, grocery shopping, preparation and clean-up

Food Studies 30 – offered in alternate years

Additional course fees will apply

  • provides students with instruction and experience related to Canada’s Food Guide, The Science of Nutrition, Current Food Issues, Exploring Careers, and other modules
  • offers students opportunity to prepare foods, including eggs and protein dishes, salads and vegetable dishes, baking and ethnic cuisine
  • facilitates student understanding of global food issues, including poverty, food additives, genetically modified foods, organic foods, and so on

Information Processing 10

  • provides basic computer skills to process many types of information efficiently
  • encourages students to participate in online communication activities as well as become efficient and critical users of Internet resources
  • video, photography and sound editing are optional topics
  • uses productivity tools to enter, edit, manipulate, and share information

Information Processing 20

Students are introduced to

  • advanced features of word processing and spreadsheet applications
  • the optional topics include the creation of a set of web pages including links, graphics and friendly navigation

Information Processing 30

Students are introduced to

  • advanced features of the database and presentation software applications
  • the optional topics include the creation of digital still and/or video projects

Personal Finance 30 – offered in alternate years

  • introduces the student to the concepts, attitudes, principles and skills of effective management of personal financial matters
  • explore God’s instruction on personal finance
  • investigates specific issues: market economics, decision-making strategies, financial institutions, products and services, credit, taxation, budgets, investment, saving, spending, financing, owning, leasing, renting, and threats to financial standing


SCIENCE

Science 9

  • general science which further develops areas of biology, chemistry, and physics
  • units include topics related to human development and reproduction; chemical processes which relate to atoms and elements; study of electricity and the exploration of our universe.

Science 10

  • covers various topics within the disciplines of chemistry, physics and biology
  • topics include: the diversity, change and the stability of ecosystems; chemical process related to elements, compounds, chemical reactions as well as acids and bases; the study of motion with how it relates to distance, speed and acceleration; and weather dynamics – the processes that cause weather and the forecasting of weather.
  • Students will also investigate career paths related to the various disciplines and sub-disciplines of science

Environmental Science 20

●   Science 10 is a prerequisite

The new environmental science course being offered teaches students how to systematically examine the impacts that any action has on both the local and global environment. Students will learn geological, biological, chemical, and geographical techniques for analyzing the contents of the environment. They will learn to evaluate how changes to an environment will result in changes to the contents in that environment. This process is often referred to as an environmental impact assessment. These kinds of assessments are used in almost all industries at some point, and as a result this kind of course leads to many lucrative careers. To practice this students will take real measurements of the environment, and evaluate real environmental impacts. This will require field trips and some outdoor time.

Health Science 20

●   Science 10 is a prerequisite

Do you want to learn about your own health to be able to make informed personal and career choices? Health Science might be the right course for you.

This course will challenge you to look at the health science field from holistic and analytical perspectives to provide a basis for making personal health choices. You will examine the range of philosophies that guide health care and consider ethical decision within those contexts. Understanding the basic anatomy and physiology of the human body will provide context for studying the normal and abnormal functioning of various body systems, including the role of nutrition and metabolism. You will examine diagnostic tools and procedures and how they are used to inform treatment. You will investigate the range of health science careers and post-secondary programs available in Saskatchewan.

Physical Science 20

●   Science 10 is a prerequisite

Do you wonder how chemistry and physics help industry, agriculture, and pure science research move forward? Physical Science will allow you to investigate scientific concepts in a hands-on, lab-based manner.

This course combines chemistry and physics in an integrated manner to investigate concepts related to heating and cooling, the foundations of chemistry, including the mole and quantitative analysis of molecules and chemical reactions, and the characteristics and properties of waves. An overarching theme is the study of the enterprise of public and private science as it occurs in agriculture, industry, and universities to help you better understand various physical science related career paths. An inquiry project will guide your independent investigations of physical science phenomena.

Computer Science 20
●   Science 10 is a prerequisite

  • study major themes dealing with computers including current hardware and good programming ethics
  • discusses ethics of computer use in today’s world
  • introduces creating programs for the computer in QBasic and Visual Basic.Net

Computer Science 30

●   Computer Science 20 is a prerequisite

  • three major themes include current hardware, current issues involving computers and good programming techniques
  • uses Visual Basic for programming language
  • major research project dealing with controversial issues faced when working with computers in society today

Biology 30

●   Science 10 is a prerequisite

  • covers basic cell physiology, plant and animal physiology, reproduction, heredity and evolution
  • topics are studied in light of biblical principles in order to illustrate the correlation between Bible truth and biological science

Chemistry 30

●   Physical Science 20 is a prerequisite

  • emphasizes the understanding and application of chemical concepts in a problem solving manner
  • topics include energy of reactions, rates of reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions and chemical bonding
  • gives glory to God while studying the intricacy of nature

Physics 30

●   Physical Science 20 is a prerequisite * Pre-Calculus 20 can also be used as a prerequisite in consultation with the Guidance Counselor

  • In this course, students investigate concepts related to modern physics such as quantum mechanics, relativity, and nuclear physics. Students will analyze motion and the forces that cause motion from the perspective on Newtonian mechanics. Using the conservation laws of momentum and energy, students will analyze and predict the results of interactions between objects. Lastly, students will explore gravitational, electric and magnetic fields and their interactions. Student inquiry will guide independent investigations of physics-related phenomena. This course offers the opportunity for students to also see how theological thought in the church on issues such as free will, the soul and God have been influenced by scientific thought.


SOCIAL STUDIES / HISTORY

Social Studies 9

Social Studies 9 allows students to explore the worldviews of past societies, to consider how those worldviews were shaped and expressed, and to connect those societies and worldviews to contemporary Canadian society. Students will explore concepts such as power and authority, resources and wealth, interactions and independence, and dynamic relationships as they learn about past societies that may include (among others) Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, and Medieval Europe.

History 10

European History 1

Traces the concepts of freedom, order, equality and hierarchy from the Renaissance to the end of the 19th century. Topics include political decision making, economic decision making, ideology and the decision making process, international economic relations, international political relations.

History 20

European History 2

History 20 is a comprehensive examination of the events of world history in the 20th century starting in 1914. Major concepts, which include human rights, nationalism, imperialism, military history, politics and government among others, will be incorporated into the units of study: World War I, the rise of totalitarianism in Europe, World War II, the Cold War, and global issues. Students will learn how to work with primary and secondary sources, along with developing skills including research and presentations.

History 30 Canadian Studies

Traces the concepts of social change throughout Canadian history, people-land relationships, cross- cultural relationships, the governance of Canadian society, and Canada’s relationship with the global community. The goal is to understand the major issues facing Canadians at the end of the 20th century. The course is organized around five central units: change, economic development, culture, governance, and globalization.

Psychology 20 – offered in alternate years

  • discusses social issues and how they relate to our lives through the major psychological theorists/theories of the 20th century (psychodynamism, behavioralism, constructivism, ecological model)
  • topics include social influence, interaction and construction of reality, phobias, self-esteem
  • prioritizes a biblical approach to social issues and esteem, as well as a critique of contemporary social values

Psychology 30 – offered in alternate years

  • approaches psychology from a developmental perspective
  • looks at both biological and social factors of human development from prenatal to late adulthood
  • explores physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of human development through an active, reflective, and experimental approach

Law 30

Law 30 is designed to help assist students to become active, informed, and productive citizens who know and understand their legal rights and responsibilities. Through the course, students develop an understanding of the concept of rule of law, and learn that the law reflects, and is shaped by, society’s values and attitudes regarding social and human relationships. Topics addressed include foundations of Canada’s legal system, criminal and civil law, family law, employment and labour law, contract and consumer law, environmental law, and international law.

The AP program at RCS

AP English Literature and Composition

In Saskatchewan, all grade 12 students are required to complete English Language Arts A30 (Canadian literature and composition) and ELA B30 (world literature). The AP course in English literature and composition is an extension of these two courses. Students in the AP program will be expected to do a significant amount of reading, writing, research, and discussion in preparation for the AP exam. Students should, therefore, have an interest in literature and be willing to do the extra work. Students with an 85% average or above will automatically be enrolled in Enriched ELA and AP English. Students will elect to complete the AP exam in their grade 12 year.

AP Calculus AB

This course includes concepts not covered in Calculus 30 (including extended applications of derivatives, and integrals). There will be higher expectations on students to complete homework and assignments and to study individually as the rigor of this course is substantially greater than that of Calculus 30.

Students wishing to take this course must be identified early in their grade nine year because of the accelerated math courses they must take prior to grade 12.

AP Studio Art (2-D and Drawing)

The Advanced Placement Studio Art course is an extension of Visual Art 30 and is intended for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art. Students must be committed to spending significantly more time than they do in the typical art class. The portfolio that is created will  be used for final evaluation in AP and is a great asset to students who are applying for scholarships, bursaries, and/or entrance into post-secondary art programs.

Studio Art (2-D and Drawing) Strand

Students interested in AP Studio Art must apply to the High School Administration Office in advance of Grade 11.

 

We believe the study of a wide range of resources that support curriculum is valuable.  Through our studies across a variety of disciplines, we teach students to understand and evaluate all concepts in light of Scripture and a Biblical Worldview.  We choose resources to support curricula at Regina Christian School based on the course structures provided by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Education and for Advanced Placement courses, the College Board as well.  All resources reflect our philosophy of presenting information in light of a Biblical Worldview.  Consequently, RCS students are required to read and evaluate a variety of literature and other documents - both Christian and secular - which enable us to discuss societal values and issues from a Christ-centered perspective.  Our goal is to prepare students to engage potentially controversial ideas equipped with a Biblical mindset.